By Upper Columbia Conference Communications Team

If you have been a part of the Seventh-day Adventist Church for long enough, you will inevitably hear the term: Constituency Session.

If you have been a part of the Seventh-day Adventist Church for long enough, you will inevitably hear the term: Constituency Session. There usually seems to be a finality to the term when it is used. It often sounds big and heavy. In a lot of ways, that is true.

To describe it simply, a Constituency Session is how our church operates.

As a member, a Constituency Session could seem uninteresting and uninviting. However, it is how our denomination as a whole is organized and how all members have the opportunity to help make decisions for the church. The decisions impact your local church, your local conference, your local union, your local division, and so on.

During Constituency Session for Washington Conference, officers and department directors are elected, amendments to the constitution and bylaws are considered, and committees are formed. This includes the executive committee, which provides guidance and governance for the conference throughout the term and makes decisions when the constituency is not in session.

Delegates are the driving force of a Constituency Session.

These delegates are selected by all local churches in the conference and participate in voting along with the at-large delegates. At-large delegates consist of pastors and local conference personnel.

Though all members are invited to attend the Constituency Session, only delegates are allowed to address the constituents and vote.

This year is the 61st Constituency Session of Washington Conference and will be held at Auburn Adventist Academy Church on Sunday, May 5.

To learn more about constituency sessions, you can read the article the North Pacific Union Gleaner published titled “How the Church Works.”